Port Lincoln locals enjoy Endeavour visit

HISTORICAL: HMB Endeavour captain John Dikkenberg said people in Port Lincoln showed great enthusiasm while they were aboard the ship.

HISTORICAL: HMB Endeavour captain John Dikkenberg said people in Port Lincoln showed great enthusiasm while they were aboard the ship.

The HMB Endeavour has completed its week-long visit to Port Lincoln with nearly 1000 people visiting the replica ship during that time.

The Endeavour, a replica of Captain James Cook’s ship of the same name, arrived in Port Lincoln on March 3 and was docked at Brennan Wharf for one week.

During this time the ship was open to the public to walk around what was a recreation of what the ship would’ve been like when Captain Cook sailed on it in the 18th century.

It’s estimated the ship saw about 500 people from the general public come aboard with about 400 school children also having the chance to take a look.

The Endeavour’s captain John Dikkenberg said interest from the general public was high during the visit to Port Lincoln.

“I think people have little appreciation about what the 18th century was like until they come down,” he said.

Locals also had the chance to come aboard the Endeavour as it set sail for Portland, Victoria on Thursday.

People had the option to come aboard as voyage crew or as a supernumerary.

Voyage crew get to work on the ship which includes climbing the rig, tying down the ship and doing fire drills. Supernumeraries are basic passengers although most do end up helping with tasks around the ship.

From Port Lincoln the ship gained 14 people for the voyage to Portland, with 12 serving as voyage crew. 

Captain Dikkenberg said no matter where the ship goes, there are always people interested in it.

“We make sure the Endeavour is something people enjoy being a part of,” he said.

In its 20 year history the ship has now visited Port Lincoln about four times.

The Endeavour will make its way up north towards Queensland before the end of the year and will next year make its regular appearance at the Wooden Boat Show in Tasmania.

Captain Dikkenberg said there were plans to sail west again next year, although what ports it will visit are yet to be determined.

“No one in Australia gets much of an opportunity, there’s only one ship and that’s why you share it around,” he said.

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