Nuffield a ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity

SCHOLAR: Jonas Woolford (right) has received a 2017 Nuffield Scholarship to study the co-management of fishing resources, he is pictured with Michael Thomas.

SCHOLAR: Jonas Woolford (right) has received a 2017 Nuffield Scholarship to study the co-management of fishing resources, he is pictured with Michael Thomas.

JONAS Woolford has the opportunity to research the co-management of fisheries around the world as part of his 2017 Nuffield Scholarship achievement. 

Nuffield Australia Farming Scholarships awards primary producers with life-changing scholarships to travel overseas and study a topic of their choice.

Mr Woolford said the first seven weeks of the scholarship included the International Nuffield Conference in Brazil, followed by six weeks of meetings and a further eight weeks of study to focus on his chosen topic

“The schedule for the first seven weeks is hectic, nine countries in seven weeks non-stop, no breaks, not even for Easter when I'm likely to be in Kenya,” he said.

Mr Woolford said he was looking forward to exploring where co-management had been applied well around the world. 

“I'm feeling exceptionally excited, very grateful and a little daunted by the once in a lifetime opportunity afforded to me by Fisheries Research and Development Corporation and Nuffield South Australia who are my sponsors for the 16 weeks of study and travel around the world,” he said. 

He said he would investigate the cohesion between primary industry, community and government for the effective co-management of natural resources in the inherently complex seafood industry.

“I want to explore examples of where co-management has been applied well and is working, I want to unpack why it is working to really understand those factors so I can apply them back here in my industry and community.

“The seafood industry is inherently complex as the resource is owned by the crown and those with a commercial licence receive an allocation, which is only issued for a specific period of time.

“This resource is also shared with recreational groups and importantly, Aboriginal traditional owners,” he said.

He said spatial access to fishing grounds was affected by other factors like aquaculture, shipping, mining, oil and gas exploration, defence and biodiversity conservation like marine parks.  

“This means that co-management is key to ensure that our precious natural resources are cared for and utilised in the best way for all concerned.

“Fisheries is a complex industry with a complex resource sharing arrangement and I want to ensure we work together so we can all have fish for the future,” Mr Woolford said. 

Mr Woolford will travel to Japan, Scandinavia, Europe, New Zealand, Canada and the United States as part of his scholarship.

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