Ravendale Sports Complex electricity pricing

POWER CHANGES: Log-in electricity meters would make it easier to on-charge Ravendale users for the power they use but the complex itself would be kept separate.

POWER CHANGES: Log-in electricity meters would make it easier to on-charge Ravendale users for the power they use but the complex itself would be kept separate.

LOG-IN electricity meters are likely to be installed at the Ravendale Sports Complex to make it easier to on-charge users for the power they use.

Under the current system, the council on-charges the energy and network usage charges based on monthly sub-meter readings and demand charges are based on a pro-rata user pays basis.

The proposed log-in system would charge users a set kilowatt per hour rate (reviewed annually) based on actual use by each user, recorded and calculated by the metering system. The complex building would remain separate.

Port Lincoln City Council’s finance and business manager David Levey said a similar log-in system, recently installed at Port Pirie, was working successfully.

He said it would be simpler and more efficient, and stakeholders had agreed in principle to the option at a June meeting.

The council voted earlier this month to install two log-in metering units, which would cost about $28,000, subject to agreement from the majority of Ravendale user groups.

Mr Levey said the way Ravendale user groups had been charged for electricity had been an ongoing matter for several years following the introduction of a new sports ground tariff and a peak demand charge regime in 2010/11, which significantly impacted the cost of power for all users. 

He said various council initiatives and actions had reduced the total electricity costs from a peak of $71,621.74 in 2013/14 to $32,286.99 in 2015/16 but the basis for on-charging user groups had always been contentious. 

2016 will be the last year for a transitional user rebate from the council. Rate and peak demand SA Power Networks tariffs charged in July, so staff took the opportunity to review the on-charging system in consultation with users.

Under the log-in system, Mr Levey said the penalty effect of peak demand charges would be spread across all users, not only sports active during peak demand charge times of the year. 

While the associations support the system in principle, councillor Danny Bartlett questioned what the individual clubs would think when they realised it was costing them more per kilowatt hour.

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