Letters to the editor

Historical Pioneer Tower

I live in Tumby Bay, moving here 17 years ago from Adelaide.

One of the first things I noticed when I arrived in Tumby Bay was the clock, facing me as we drove down North Terrace to the Esplanade. It is situated next to the Ritz Café, which has its own history.  

It made sure I didn’t run out of road and into the Bay. A few years ago the clock was dismantled as it was getting old and tired, mostly due to the salt air attacking the structure. A call went out for ideas to replace the clock and quite a few suggestions of what could be constructed in its place were presented at a meeting for the locals who were invited to select a preference, keeping in mind the base of the old clock is still available for the replacement to be referred to as The Pioneer Tower.

Most of the ideas were centred on fishing, mining and wheat in Tumby and area.

As I am a great believer that history should be preserved I think this is an excellent idea. However a new path appears to be opening up to us. In the past few months the painting of local silos has been to the fore, with almost every small country town with a silo wishing they could have it painted, (well those who can afford it).

We are trying to increase tourism to the town and looking for ideas to lure the tourists into the town. 

The paintings on the silos will face the town, not the main Highway as they would be a distraction to passing motorists. They would require a new parking bay and a public convenience.

Tourists may stop, but they may possibly just stop, look and drive on, some may use it as a toilet stop, as they could think this is all Tumby Bay has to offer. I can assure you that tourists who visit Tumby Bay National Trust Museum think we are the jewel in the crown.

The preferred replacement for the clock is a Pioneer Tower which depicts all our town and district has to offer, mining, farming, fishing and once it has been erected there would be many, many years for locals AND visitors to the town to enjoy.

The Pioneer Tower will be a 24-hour visionary monument as the panels will be lit by solar and the “cut  outs” or figures will be visible at night, perhaps an incentive for visitors to consider an overnight stay.  A spectacular sight…

All expense will have been met at the initial installation whereas the silos will have to be repainted every eight to 10yrs; I wonder at whose expense?

So, perhaps, we carefully consider the choice we may have to make.

JUNE HEDLEY

Tumby Bay

The postal vote

Recently we have heard many opinions concerning same sex marriage but what is God’s opinion?

The Bible shows God’s blessing of sex only within the marriage covenant between a man and a woman. Therefore, sex outside of this, whether pre-marital, extra-marital or same-sex, is forbidden. Therefore, homosexual practice is sin and blessing it is also sin (Romans 1:32).

1 Corinthians 6:9-10 lists various sins including adultery, homosexual practice, theft, drunkeness, and more, all of which keep us from the kingdom of God. Such things should never be normalised. 

Today there is no push to promote theft, drunkenness or adultery, and neither should there be. Likewise, we cannot promote and normalise homosexual practice. This agenda says that it is no longer a sin for which you need God’s forgiveness. Therefore, it hinders rather than helps people from finding true peace and joy in Jesus Christ.

Our sins, of any sort, separate us from God, but “God commends his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8). Jesus died so that sinners, both heterosexual and homosexual, might be saved.

Addressing our sins, God tells us that we are wrong and that our sin brings death and judgement but he also shows us that we are loved and that Jesus died for us, suffering in our place, so that coming to him with repentance and faith we can be pardoned (Ephesians 2:4–7).

Christians are not without our sins. The difference is: We mourn over them. We don’t legislate for them. We turn to Jesus for forgiveness and help. We have hope, not because we are better than others but because Jesus is able and willing to save those who come unto him. (Hebrews 7:25).

KYLE GRAHAM

Minister of the Free Presbyterian Church of SA, Port Lincoln

Prepare now

For many of us it’s unthinkable. Until it happens, and then it’s too late. We all face emergencies. They can all be devastating, such as the recent extreme weather and storm events that caused flooding, hail damage and power outages across SA.

In Emergency Preparedness Week (September 17-24), Red Cross is asking you to take one easy step to make your next emergency less stressful. These are simple and practical steps you can take to protect the people you love, your own wellbeing and the things you value most.

Easy things to help you prepare include: 

- think about being in an emergency situation and how you might react. This will help you stay calmer and respond better when an emergency happens.

- find out where to get important disaster information, like your local radio emergency broadcaster. This means you’re better informed when an emergency happens.

 – get to know your neighbours. They’re the people who might support you and look out for you when an emergency happens.

For more easy things to do, get your Red Cross RediPlan at redcross.org.au/prepare.

MARK GROOTE

Director, Red Cross South Australia