Kernilla Lane to recognise early history

KERNILLA LANE: Mayor Low standing on what was Low Lane, now to be named Kernilla Lane, about three kilometres west of North Shields. Ms Low once lived in the house known as 'Kernilla' at the end of the lane.
KERNILLA LANE: Mayor Low standing on what was Low Lane, now to be named Kernilla Lane, about three kilometres west of North Shields. Ms Low once lived in the house known as 'Kernilla' at the end of the lane.

Low Lane, on the outskirts of North Shields, will be renamed Kernilla Lane in recognition of the ‘Kernilla’ homestead built at the end of the lane.

Former Kernilla resident Julie Low, who is also the Lower Eyre Peninsula District Council mayor, said she was “really happy” Low Lane recognised the Low contribution to the region, however she felt the name ‘Kernilla’ had a “more historical connection”.

In his book Fading Footprints, Jack Casanova wrote the area was originally called “Curranilla” and was settled by pioneer pastoralist Dr McKecknie.

Ms Low said the site was gazetted as a water reserve and was one of several sites for drovers to water their stock between Port Augusta and Port Lincoln.

“(Kernilla was) really important in the early days of exploration,” Ms Low said.

She said the original homestead was built in 1902 and she moved in to the house after marrying her late husband Ian Low in 1979.

It burnt down in the 2005 Wangary bushfire and another house has been built on the same site.