Sleaford residents raise development concerns

AN action group has been re-formed to voice concerns over the proposed $150 million tourism and residential development at Sleaford.

ACTION GROUP: An action group has been formed to voice concerns over a proposed tourism and residentail development at Sleaford. Pictured are residents Bob Theakstone, James Stagg, Sue Stagg, Delia Farlam, Glenn Theakstone, David Farlam, Bett de la Perrelle Bradley Theakstone, Peter Theakstone, Michelle de la Perrelle, Tom de la Perrelle and Jess de la Perrelle. The development proposal comprises of 200 hectares with about 350 housing allotments and 50 holiday units.

ACTION GROUP: An action group has been formed to voice concerns over a proposed tourism and residentail development at Sleaford. Pictured are residents Bob Theakstone, James Stagg, Sue Stagg, Delia Farlam, Glenn Theakstone, David Farlam, Bett de la Perrelle Bradley Theakstone, Peter Theakstone, Michelle de la Perrelle, Tom de la Perrelle and Jess de la Perrelle. The development proposal comprises of 200 hectares with about 350 housing allotments and 50 holiday units.

Starting the campaign are residents Delia and David Farlam, Bett de la Perrelle and Michelle de la Perrelle, who are concerned about the development's sustainability and planning.

The 200-hectare development proposed by Ron Forster comprises about 350 housing allotments and 50 holiday units, which is similar to the development proposed in 2010.

"The density and volume of housing remains the same and will substantially impact on the immediate and surrounding environments," Michelle de la Perrelle said.

She said there had been no provision for infrastructure and services to support a new population, which would be living in a development that had the potential to be larger than Coffin Bay.

The number of proposed dwellings could make it a similar size to Cummins.

Both of these towns have supporting industries, education and health services, government departments and local government managed sewerage, power, water and telephone.

"Sleaford Bay is entirely dependent on Port Lincoln for all of these," Mrs de la Perrelle said.

She said the group was also concerned the development would mean the land would be rezoned from coastal and general farming to residential.

"(This is) a major change to the land use."

"The farming land in question is not an unviable farming enterprise, it is some of the most sustainable farming land in the Eyre Peninsula," Mrs de la Perrelle said.

As a coastal zoned area the group believes there are factors that mean it would not be conducive to an intense development.

"You only need to look at the sparse vegetation and the angle that the sheoaks that are growing along the seaside to see that this area is very windy and has fragile soil," Mrs de la Perrelle said.

"Sleaford Bay is loved for its rugged coastline, whale watching, surfing, fishing and as a place of peace.

"It needs to be preserved."

The Lower Eyre Peninsula District Council is getting more information before making any final decisions about the proposal.

It is in the process of getting government agency feedback, and is also considering the cost and benefit of providing council infrastructure and services to support the development.

The council will look at provision of medical services, emergency management, educational facility impacts, the impact on beach and coastal access, health impacts and viability of waste water, and the capacity and capability of standalone power systems.

The action group, which wants to hear from people who would like to help or join, plans to make a deputation at the council's February meeting.

By Bonnie Puckridge