Sceale Bay sparkles in national survey

SURFING BEACH: Emma Campion, pictured at Sceale Bay, said she taught the importance of looking after the beach in her surfing lessons. Inset:?Friends of Sceale Bay has worked to look after the beach, including the native wildlife like Australian sea lions. Photograph: Grant Hobson.
SURFING BEACH: Emma Campion, pictured at Sceale Bay, said she taught the importance of looking after the beach in her surfing lessons. Inset:?Friends of Sceale Bay has worked to look after the beach, including the native wildlife like Australian sea lions. Photograph: Grant Hobson.
NATIVE WILDLIFE: Friends of Sceale Bay has worked to look after Sceale Bay, including the native wildlife including Australian sea lions. Photograph: Grant Hobson.

NATIVE WILDLIFE: Friends of Sceale Bay has worked to look after Sceale Bay, including the native wildlife including Australian sea lions. Photograph: Grant Hobson.

SCEALE Bay has been recognised as one of the cleanest beaches in Australia following a national survey looking at marine debris on coastal sites.

The national survey is a part of TeachWild, a three year marine debris research program developed by EarthWatch Australia, in partnership with CSIRO and Shell.

More than 172 coastal sites were surveyed around the country, starting north of Cairns and then estimating the next site every 100 kilometres.

The survey revealed Sceale Bay ranks amongst the cleanest sites in South Australia.

The CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship research team reported Sceale Bay was the site where they found fewer pieces of debris in South Australia.

Research team leader Dr Britta Denise Hardesty said the team did not have any prior information before going to any of the sites.

"We aren't aiming to find really dirty or really clean beaches, we are aiming to find out what is representative," she said.

"For the same reason, we don't try to carry out transects on the really dirty or really clean parts of beaches, me make sure we don't bias our results in that way."

The team also found the site at Border Village near the Western Australian border to have an exceptionally high amount of debris.

This news is a big boost for the local community, with many members regularly cleaning rubbish off the beach.

One person who frequently utilises Sceale Bay is Emma Campion, who is a surfing instructor with JC Surf School at Surfers Beach.

Ms Campion said her Dad had lived in the area for 15 years, and she had lived there for two years and they had seen the efforts by people to maintain Sceale Bay.

"It's well looked after, local residents walk up and down on a regular basis and do their part," she said.

"Local people Greg and Judy Windows frequently clean up the beach, and Allan and Mary Jane clean up a lot and look after the shelter shed."

Ms Campion said she also talked about the importance of looking after the beach environment as a part of her surfing lessons.

Friends of Sceale Bay has also been active in protecting the area's environment with a boardwalk being installed so people do not affect the sand dunes.

Group convener Grant Hobson said the group appreciated the acknowledgement, and the result came from people willing to help.

"Bob Minnican and others have done a lot to protect the area, and the locals do a great job picking up rubbish," he said.

"I also think because it's so clean you do feel guilty to leave rubbish behind, and there's a momentum of everyone making an effort."

Friends of Sceale Bay also thanked Natural Resource Management workers and Wirangu volunteers, who have put in many hours to remove boxthorns.

Despite the TeachWild acknowledgement, Mr Hobson said there was still much to do.

"The other side of it is when these sort of accolades are given, you will usually see an increased usage of people," he said.

"We will need to increase our vigilance in managing the beach, and also need to ensure appropriate management is in place."

This story Sceale Bay sparkles in national survey first appeared on West Coast Sentinel.

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