Couple were born to be together

SHARED BIRTH NOTICE: Olivia and Martin Sheridan look through the October 16, 1975, Port Lincoln Times featuring their birth notices, which are both in his baby album. INSET: The birth notices as they appeared.

SHARED BIRTH NOTICE: Olivia and Martin Sheridan look through the October 16, 1975, Port Lincoln Times featuring their birth notices, which are both in his baby album. INSET: The birth notices as they appeared.

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SHARED BIRTH NOTICE: Olivia and Martin Sheridan look through the October 16, 1975, Port Lincoln Times featuring their birth notices, which are both in his baby album. INSET: The birth notices as they appeared.

SHARED BIRTH NOTICE: Olivia and Martin Sheridan look through the October 16, 1975, Port Lincoln Times featuring their birth notices, which are both in his baby album. INSET: The birth notices as they appeared.

WHEN babies births are announced in the local paper families and friends don't tend to take too much notice of the other notices around them.

But if Olivia Sheridan's (nee Fairclough) family took a closer look at her birth notice in the Port Lincoln Times it would have given them an insight into her future.

Mrs Sheridan and her twin sister Belinda were born on October 8, 1975 so when her sister was looking through old copies of the Port Lincoln Times from the 1970s, researching softball history she came across their birth notice.

After finding it she was astounded to see a familiar name in the birth notice below - her sister's new husband Martin Sheridan.

Mr Sheridan was a born a day after the twins, halfway across the country in Western Australia but his birth was announced in the Times because his grandparents had a farm at Tooligie Hill.

The Sheridans later moved to Port Lincoln but he and his future wife went to different schools and despite knowing the same circles of friends and his mother and her auntie working together, they never met formally until they started working, both of them as teachers.

"I was working at Port Lincoln Primary School and he came in for a relief teaching job," Mrs Sheridan said.

"He came in and took my class and that's how we met again."

They became friends and have been together for about five years, marrying last November.

They have since found their birth notices, one under the other, in Mr Sheridan's baby album kept by his grandparents but it would likely have gone unnoticed.

Mrs Sheridan said it was an amazing coincidence and she has since had people tell her they were going back to check the other birth notices when their children were born to find their future partners.

"It just goes to show, even if your family has left Lincoln for a while or due to circumstances, like being a twin and needing to be delivered in Adelaide, that notices placed in the Port Lincoln Times are important no matter where you are," Mrs Reynolds said.