Electorate questions | Hammond

We asked the people above: Do political candidates need to have grown up in an electorate to represent it? Do they need to live there at all?

IN country electorates, and occasionally in blue-ribbon city ones, candidates may not always be people with long-standing ties to the area, or who even live there.

Sometimes high-profile candidates get parachuted in from outside.

Sometimes city residents are allocated country seats to try and win a percentage of the vote for their party, or simply to raise the profile of their upper house (Legislative Council) colleagues.

Sometimes, if we're honest, the sort of hard-working, passionate people who might make good politicians just move house and might seek to use their skills to serve a new area.

Do political candidates need to have grown up in an area to represent it?

Do they even need to live there?

Click on our poll below to have your say.

Hammond 2 2014

"It depends. If the person has lived somewhere else and done the job, maybe. But they need to get to know the people. It'd be different if it was somebody everybody knew off the TV or something, but I'd rather have someone local." - Steve Kingi, Murray Bridge

"It depends. If the person has lived somewhere else and done the job, maybe. But they need to get to know the people. It'd be different if it was somebody everybody knew off the TV or something, but I'd rather have someone local." - Steve Kingi, Murray Bridge

"It depends on the person, the quality of the candidate. If you get a local who wouldn't do any good and an intelligent bloke, who would you rather? The bloke who's going to do a good job. That's the rational way to think about it. I'm against jobs for the boys." - Peter Squires, Tailem Bend

"It depends on the person, the quality of the candidate. If you get a local who wouldn't do any good and an intelligent bloke, who would you rather? The bloke who's going to do a good job. That's the rational way to think about it. I'm against jobs for the boys." - Peter Squires, Tailem Bend

"Yes, definitely. They know the area and know what the area needs if they're from there."
Eddie Williams, Murray Bridge

"Yes, definitely. They know the area and know what the area needs if they're from there." Eddie Williams, Murray Bridge

"Yes. They should know the background of the town." - Katrina Parfitt, Moora, Western Australia

"Yes. They should know the background of the town." - Katrina Parfitt, Moora, Western Australia

"Being from the area does offer the benefit of knowing what the area needs. They don't necessarily need to be from the area, but they need to put the time in, talking to people, getting the best understanding they can. If they come in, punch their ticket from nine to five and bugger off, it generates a negative opinion." - Jason Wakefield, Murray Bridge

"Being from the area does offer the benefit of knowing what the area needs. They don't necessarily need to be from the area, but they need to put the time in, talking to people, getting the best understanding they can. If they come in, punch their ticket from nine to five and bugger off, it generates a negative opinion." - Jason Wakefield, Murray Bridge

This story Electorate questions | Hammond first appeared on The Murray Valley Standard.

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