Settled living in Ceduna

CEDUNA: Ceduna registered nurse Supraja Elaiyavalli met Minister Martin Hamilton-Smith, pictured holding baby Elliott earlier this week.
CEDUNA: Ceduna registered nurse Supraja Elaiyavalli met Minister Martin Hamilton-Smith, pictured holding baby Elliott earlier this week.

CEDUNA registered nurse Supraja Elaiyavalli is one of many skilled and business migration nominations Minister for Investment and Trade Martin Hamilton-Smith recognised during his tour with the cabinet this week.

Skilled and business migrants are increasingly looking to settle in South Australia, with 1495 nominations received this financial year, helping to boost South Australia's economic growth.

Mr Hamilton-Smith said in 2013-14, 2226 skilled migrants and 130 new business migrants were nominated by the state government to relocate to South Australia.

"Attracting business and skilled migrants to South Australia is critical, as it helps create further investment, job opportunities and greater industry capability," Mr Hamilton-Smith said.

"We are actively encouraging these migrants, and their families, to consider settling in South Australia's regional communities."

He said attracting the best from around the world, like Ms Elaiyavalli, was critical to filling skills shortages and boosting economic activity.

"Migrants have the potential to bring a new set of skills, connections and international experiences that can help grow and modernise our economy," Mr Hamilton-Smith said.

Registered nurse Supraja Elaiyavalli arrived in Australia from the United States in 2012.

The 29-year-old lives in Ceduna and said living in regional South Australia had been the best way to immerse herself into Australia's culture.

"I love it here," Ms Elaiyavalli said

"When I first applied for a job I thought Ceduna was a suburb of Adelaide, but I soon learned that the people are really friendly, there's the ocean two blocks away and I've been able to experience things I never would have, living in Adelaide."

"You learn about Australia and Aboriginal culture, and because you can't stick to your own ethnic group as you would in the city you make friends with the locals very quickly," she said.

This story Settled living in Ceduna first appeared on West Coast Sentinel.