Port Lincoln students prepare Wakakirri performances

PERFORMERS: Port Lincoln Primary School students show they are ready for the Wakakirri performances. Pictured are (back): Rylee Marks, Holly Gurney; front: Mikayla Edwards, Lucy Claughton and Elli Hancock.
PERFORMERS: Port Lincoln Primary School students show they are ready for the Wakakirri performances. Pictured are (back): Rylee Marks, Holly Gurney; front: Mikayla Edwards, Lucy Claughton and Elli Hancock.

Port Lincoln Primary School is getting ready to tell another story through music and dance in this year’s Wakakirri performances.

Celebrating its 25th year Wakakirri is a national story festival which challenges young Australians to create a story, share it with Australia and have a positive impact on the world around them.

Port Lincoln Primary School has been involved with Wakakirri for a number of years and performances have covered a number of topics including environmentalism, expressing yourself, bullying, video games and the stolen generation.

This year the primary school will be putting on four concerts at the Nautilus Theatre, starting on Monday with a full dress rehersal at 10am followed by another show at 7pm.

The final will be on Tuesday and Wednesday, each starting at 7pm.

The primary school’s student well-being and social inclusion officer Anne Hueppauff said each item the school performed needed to tell a story, with a clear “beginning, middle and end” through a blend of creative movement and acting.

Many amazing ideas have come from the students and they feel a great sense of pride and ownership over their work.

Anne Hueppauff

This year the primary school will cover a number of issues and ideas with its performances.

These include stories about reconciliation and Australian history, technology and its effects on young people and a story set in Africa.

“Many amazing ideas have come from the students and they feel a great sense of pride and ownership over their work,” she said.

This year the primary school has entered into the Screen Challenge Story Dance section, which allows schools to film their performances and include elements such as special effects or animation in the editing process.

Mrs Hueppauff said the school was inviting family, friends and community members to come and celebrate the performing arts achievements of its students.

Tickets are available through the primary school office and at the Nautilus Theatre if there are unsold tickets.

The word Wakakirri comes from the Wangaaypuwan people from Cobar, New South Wales and means “to dance a story”.

Wakakirri is the largest multi arts event for schools in Australia and aims to be accessible and affordable for schools to take part in.

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