Proposed Kimba nuclear waste facility to bring 45 jobs

JOBS: ANSTO chief executive officer Dr Adi Paterson and Sutherland Shire mayor Carmelo Pesce visited Kimba on Friday.
JOBS: ANSTO chief executive officer Dr Adi Paterson and Sutherland Shire mayor Carmelo Pesce visited Kimba on Friday.

Forty-five jobs will follow the proposed National Radioactive Waste Management Facility according to Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) chief executive officer Dr Adi Paterson. 

Dr Paterson visited Kimba on Friday with Carmelo Pesce, the mayor of the Sutherland Shire, which is home to the Lucas Heights reactor.

Dr Paterson said this number was much larger than the 15 jobs originally announced but it was based on the experience at ANSTO with nuclear waste management and not all jobs would be for scientific specialists with university degrees.

“Out of the 45, roughly 26 jobs will have on-site training, some would need TAFE training or cadetships, and some will be apprenticeships,” Dr Paterson said.

“There will also be jobs in the outreach facility for visitors and school groups.”

The 45 jobs will vary from full-time work, to shift work and on-call.

Dr Paterson said the announcement to the Kimba Economic Working Group and Consultative Committee and other members of the community received a positive reaction.

“Fifteen jobs is valuable to a community like Kimba but 45 jobs is just something different and will bring a domino effect for jobs through other businesses,” he said.

During the visit, Mr Pesce spoke to the groups about life with a nuclear reactor as a neighbour. 

The Lucas Heights facility is the second largest employee in the Sutherland Shire behind the council.

“We (the council) have a really great relationship with ANSTO,” Mr Pesce said.

“They interact with different community groups and sponsor numerous events, like Relay for Life and Australia Day.”

Dr Paterson said ANSTO would be creating an innovation precinct surround the Lucas Heights facility and would build its employee base up to 5000.

“We also work with environmental and agricultural groups and are currently assisting in developing more farming solutions,” he said.

“We met with an agricultural group here (on Friday) to discuss things.”

If the proposed facility does go ahead in Kimba, Dr Paterson said it would receive a number of ongoing visits.

“There would be ongoing visits from independent regulators, visiting scientist and general visitors like tourists and school groups.”

This story Proposed Kimba nuclear waste facility to bring 45 jobs first appeared on Eyre Peninsula Tribune.