EP history protected for 40 years

ALL ABOARD: Port Lincoln Railway Museum president Peter Knife wears an authentic South Australian Railways officers cap on the railway platform at the back of the building.
ALL ABOARD: Port Lincoln Railway Museum president Peter Knife wears an authentic South Australian Railways officers cap on the railway platform at the back of the building.

A law protecting the heritage of the Port Lincoln Railway Station turned 40 this month, ensuring natural and cultural heritage around South Australia remains authentic and accessible to future generations.

Port Lincoln Railway Museum president Peter Knife said the South Australian Heritage Act, which places limits on changes to heritage listed buildings, was “absolutely wonderful” as it kept the building and museum as close to original as possible.

“Four years ago there was a big refurbishment...it was a really good preservation job in consultation with the Heritage Trust,” Mr Knife said.

SA Heritage Council chair Keith Conlon said the act was a significant achievement for the state.

“Maintaining the state’s heritage is so important to the South Australian community, because these are the places that tell us who we are, and if we lose them, they are gone forever,” he said.

According to the heritage places database search, there are six heritage listed sites in the Port Lincoln City Council, 71 in the Lower Eyre Peninsula District Council, and 49 in the Tumby Bay District Council areas.

Along with the railway station, these include the Pioneer Mill Museum, Hawson’s grave, Boston House, the former Coffin Bay Whaling Site in the Coffin Bay National Park, the Tumby Bay Hotel and the Koppio Smith Museum.