Bond's Happiness Project reveals Kimba as kindest town

COMMUNITY SPIRIT: Jodie Macklin, Sue Woolford, Georgia Lienert and Talya Powell have all involved themselves in the Kimba community through volunteering.
COMMUNITY SPIRIT: Jodie Macklin, Sue Woolford, Georgia Lienert and Talya Powell have all involved themselves in the Kimba community through volunteering.

Kimba has been named the kindest place in the country and the best remote area to live in, according to a study by a university in Queensland.

Student researchers from Bond University created the ‘Happiness Project,’ which compiled a range of national and local data to determine the ‘happiest’ places in the country according to a series of categories.

Housing, health, education, employment, community, wealth, work-life balance, safety and accessibility were measured to score council areas on their “quality of life,” which the researchers involved believe is the closest one can get to measuring happiness.

Combining over 17,000 data points, the study concluded that Kimba has the greatest overall quality of life for a “remote area” in the country.

Kimba also has the highest volunteer rate, with over 50 per cent of the community participating in some way.

Local Sue Woolford said the townspeople had known for a while about its exceptional volunteer rate.

“All small communities rely on our volunteers,” she said.

“We’ve always been a friendly town.”

She said the community was proud of the town, and relied on working together to survive.

The Eyre Peninsula featured heavily in the study, with the Cleve district and Lower Eyre Peninsula third and fourth respectively for remote areas.

Elliston and Wudinna featured in the top five for “very remote” areas.

Kimba scored highly in employment and housing, with health, wealth and education also scored well.

Health was measured using a variety of factors including median age of death, major health risk factors such as smoking and obesity and barriers to healthcare, using data.

Much of the data was taken from the 2016 Census and public health data from 2017.

The town has been through a lot since the data was recorded, with a health crisis and lengthy public debate on the proposed radioactive waste management site putting pressure on the community.

However, community spirit and involvement appears to have not diminished, with volunteering still a high priority in the town.

This story Life nice in Kimba first appeared on Eyre Peninsula Tribune.