Letters to the editor

LETTERS: Send letters to the editor to olivia.barnes@fairfaxmedia.com.au
LETTERS: Send letters to the editor to olivia.barnes@fairfaxmedia.com.au

Great Wage DebateĀ 

It is with no great pleasure that I am compelled to comment on the wage debate in Australia.

Let me say that neither party Labor or Liberal, or public commentators (with one or two exceptions) have a clue about how to increase wages; their words make little sense.

It is not wages that are too low, but that the costs of living are too high.

And what are these costs, rents, house prices, taxation and land prices in general.

The speculation (mania for investing in property/houses) feeds into the whole economy and this is aided and abetted by negative gearing.

The result being that vast sums of money (billions) are being used by landowners, investors, and landlords and not for the production of beneficial wealth.

This wealth should be available to invest in the productive enterprises creating enormous job opportunities and therefore wage justice.

How do we fix it? Drastically cut taxation on wage earners and business enterprises, and instead collect the annual tax (ie rates) on unimproved land.

Do you realise that unimproved land value is created by the presence of the community, and the utilities and infrastructure (ie roads) built by the community.

It is this tax (or rental) that should be the basis of consolidated revenue for the community

All members of the community have the right to live a good life and enjoy the benefits from living in the country called Australia, but obviously we can't all be land owners or land holders.

Unimproved land value just means that the improvements and buildings are the property of the land owner (ie land holder) and it is the improved value that should not be taxed.

The unimproved value is created by the community at large, and it is this value that should be taxed (as rental/rates) by the government.

If this was done then Australia would surely be a land of opportunity and prosperity for all, not just a privileged few.

TREVOR SCHUBERT

Port Lincoln

Dump decisions affect region

The radioactive waste dump near Kimba is currently on hold waiting for the courts to decide whether the Barngarla people have a right to vote.

This whole process has caused a lot of anguish in the electorate of Grey after being off and then on again.

The rule changing on the run makes the current situation a disgrace.

Financial inducements and the right to vote have been restricted to small vulnerable council areas and do not reflect equal or fair distribution to all of the individuals affected by the radioactive waste dump sites.

The legislation requires broad based community consent.

Established legislation has been twisted to suit getting a waste dump somewhere.

The promised community payments of $44 million cannot be paid until the current law is changed.

At present the community funds are only to be used within the Kimba district council area.

If you live outside of Kimba or Hawker the upcoming federal election is the only vote you have to say no.

The personal connection of Kimba being nominated for a waste dump and ongoing political maneuvering by the current member for Grey cannot be overlooked.

There are far better options for radioactive waste in Australia and a vote for the current member could mean a radioactive waste dump is put on very good farming land in the centre of Eyre peninsula and this toxic waste is likely to be brought through your local town or port.

TERRY SCHMUCKER

Cootra