Colour Tumby puts in their bid for the national street art awards

FESTIVAL: Paul Stoddard and Dion LeBrun from the Tumby Bay Progress Association are optimistic about their entries in the awards.
FESTIVAL: Paul Stoddard and Dion LeBrun from the Tumby Bay Progress Association are optimistic about their entries in the awards.

The Tumby Bay silo mural and the Colour Tumby Street Art Festival as a whole have been entered into the inaugural Australian Street Art Awards in the hopes of garnering national attention.

Tumby Bay Progress Assocation member Dion LeBrun initiated the entries and said while noticing the awards' prolific online presence, the association was also tentatively contacted by the organisation.

"They are national art awards with a tourist focus....and they are geared towards rural communities," he said.

The awards are population weighted to level the playing field between entries and are focused on how the artwork is used to attract visitors and engage the community.

Some of the 12 categories include 'most instagrammable street art', 'best amusing street art', 'best mega artwork' and 'best street art festival or event', the latter two being the categories the progress association has entered.

It costs $300 to enter each category, and evidence and information to support their entries has to be provided by September 23 before winners are announced in November.

Mr LeBrun said the association wanted to use the council's SpendMapp data, which tracks electronic spending in the town using postcodes, as supporting evidence.

Association president Paul Stoddard said they would also use visitor books to prove the amount of attention the art was getting, especially from international visitors.

"The visitation here...you don't even realise the extent of it," he said.

Mr LeBrun said while no monetary award was offered for a win, increased publicity and national recognition would benefit the region.

"Obviously we'd love to win...but we're up against some pretty stiff competition," he said.

Awards manager Kim Morgan said major cities and events could attract major funding, so instead judging was focused on "what they've done with what they had".

"(Street art) is changing the face of many regional places in particular," she said.

"It's making little places stand out."