Look at ban on nets, commercial fishing

SNAPPER FREEZE: Fishers are not happy about a proposed three-year ban on snapper fishing.
SNAPPER FREEZE: Fishers are not happy about a proposed three-year ban on snapper fishing.

Why doesn't the government look at other states like Victoria.

Ban nets and commercial fishing in the gulfs.

We as recreational fisherman are a small cause to the problem, when we have long liners coming along and removing tonnes and tonnes of fish over a few days in the popular spots on the opening seasons.

We are harassed, threatened and intimidated by professionals.

We go there for our six big ones and leave but here we are, the little guys lose while the prawn trawlers tear the grounds up and the professionals catch their stock to ship interstate.

Well thank you SA government for thinking of us.

I propose a stricter bag limit and a fishing license to be brought in.

I'd be the first one to put my hand up for that, if the professionals were removed from the gulfs.

GEORGE PSEFTELIS

Adelaide

Closure should not affect West Coast

The west coast should be a classed as a separate zone.

Don't put us in the same category as the gulf.

We don't have a problem here.

Twenty years experience as a processor, our records remain consistent.

NICK FAKLIS

Ceduna

TAFE is needed

It is indeed heartening to see that Prime Minister Morrison is pushing for TAFE to be put on an equal footing with university at the premiers conference.

For too long now, there has been a growing social trend, that students need to undertake a tertiary education in order for them to be deemed successful.

Vocational training and apprenticeships have been shunned, seen to be menial areas of employment and a sign of low achievement.

However, during this over zealous pursuit of a university degree, the full time employment rate for graduates from tertiary courses has shown a declining trend:

2006 82.4%

2009 79.2%

2012 76.1%

2015 68.1%

The Australia Jobs 2015 report indicated that 85.5 per cent of apprentices and trainees were employed six months after completion and 77.6 per cent for VET graduates.

Training opportunities for future employees need to reflect the skills that are required and the jobs in growing industries where employment opportunities exist.

Pursuing higher education does not always guarantee you a job and fails to address all employers needs.

IAN MACGOWAN

Ceduna

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