Tumby Bay Area School receives $14,000 music grant

JAMMING: Tumby Bay Area School students Lucas Arnsby, Nicholas Cave and Luke Hennell get into playing some music at the school.
JAMMING: Tumby Bay Area School students Lucas Arnsby, Nicholas Cave and Luke Hennell get into playing some music at the school.

Tumby Bay Area School will use a $14,000 grant to further develop music as part of its curriculum and develop staff skills to teach music across the school.

The school was one of 19 schools and preschools across South Australia to receive funding in the first round of the state government's Music Innovation Fund, which aims to create more opportunities for children to participate in music education.

The funds will go towards the school's 'Making Music Magnificent' initiative.

Principal Nicky Prosser said the initiative aimed to make music a real entity at the school by establishing it in the primary school compound.

"The teachers have been great but many don't have a musical background," she said.

"One thing we plan to do is release (high school) music teacher Johnny McIntyre to teach in primary school and co-teach with other teachers so it builds (the students') skills as well as the teachers."

Mrs Prosser said another plan was to have Kat Eames involved to run some vocal groups next year as part of the initiative.

She said the school was grateful to the government for the funding as it would not be able to go through with the initiative without it.

"Having a really highly functioning arts curriculum is something we've been aspiring to do for years so we're really excited to now have that," she said.

The Music Innovation Fund is a part of the state government's Music Education Strategy and is making more than $500,000 available for applicants.

Education Minister John Gardner said the fund provided a chance for schools to engage children in music from an early age.

"This fund enables access to quality music education which supports and reinforces the development of literacy, language and other academic skills in children and young people," he said.

"It is also a critical enabler of social development and emotional wellbeing."

Also among the recipients from the first round was Streaky Bay Area School, which also received $14,000.

Applications for the second round of funding opened this week and will close on October 11.