Youth have it right, the world is listening

Hagen Stehr's venomous letter (Port Lincoln Times, Thursday, September 26) denigrating school kids over climate action was foolish.

His words and the words of others like him will only have the effect of invigorating this growing movement.

Ironically Hagen Stehr uses the words rubbish and garbage, which have in the past been thrown overboard by fishing fleets by the tonne.

And I wonder which of us he is referring to when he mentions "the village idiot".

This action by the kids is worldwide, it is huge and it will only continue to grow, and it is right.

16-year-old Greta Thunberg recently addressed the UN Climate Change Action Summit and said "people are dying and ecosystems are collapsing and all you can talk about is money and fairy tales of eternal economic growth".

She is right.

The often heard politicians chant of "growth growth growth" and "jobs jobs jobs" has become irrelevant.

With the rapid progress in technology jobs are being displaced at an ever increasing rate.

Capitalism as it stands is obsolete and adjustments must be made.

It is unreasonable to expect high employment levels.

The world's finances need to be apportioned in a more equitable way.

We can no longer accept that 2 per cent of the world's population control 98 per cent of the world's wealth and that people are starving while a very few are billionaires.

It must become apparent at some stage to those who lead us that technologies should serve all of the people and indeed the planet, and not just the wealthy and that they must avoid creating an (Orwellian) lower class of those who do not matter.

On the subject of climate action, the youth of the world have got it right.

They are providing a voice, a very very loud voice for the scientists who have so far been largely ignored and the world is now listening.

DAN EGLINTON

Port Lincoln

A different perspective on climate change

I think it would be a good idea for school children to study the Inigo Jones Long Term Weather Site on Facebook, to get a different perspective on climate change and a more balanced view.

BARRY WAGNER

Port Lincoln

A step too far

It's finally happened, some politicians want to push legislation to smoke pot.

Public servants in Canberra will be able to pipe up from next January under new territory laws.

What an absolute utter disgrace.

This bill should be finishing in the dust bin of history.

We in the fishing business have tried to stamp out such behaviour for years.

Having been involved in the maritime industry all of my life, I can state with absolute certainty that drugs and booze doesn't fit in our industry and is not acceptable.

Any softening of laws of any kind will create nothing but dangerous outcomes, heartbreak and misery.

Having had the misfortune of moving in and out from Canberra over many years I can assure my readers that I always thought that there were many strange people moving in the corridors of power.

But now having the right to pipe up is one step too far.

Having to deal with public servants under the influence of marijuana - God have mercy on us.

Police should have far greater power to control drugs and alcohol, not only in Canberra, but also Australia wide.

By the way, the Australian Maritime and Fisheries Academy is an absolute drug free institution, creating a new generation of drug and alcohol-free seafarers.

Dr HAGEN STEHR AO

Port Lincoln tuna operator

Time to change

As of last Sunday Australia has five different time zones.

Our inept state leaders can't even get the time zone for our state right (UCT +9).

No wonder they are so easily seduced by eastern state influences and totally ignore the huge disadvantages to its own residents in the west of the state.

S. J. DOLPHIN

Lock

Letters

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