Wangary's waste war

REDUCING WASTE: Lieutenant Landfills Latika Searle and Blayn Jackson help other students at Lake Wangary decide where their rubbish goes.
REDUCING WASTE: Lieutenant Landfills Latika Searle and Blayn Jackson help other students at Lake Wangary decide where their rubbish goes.

Lake Wangary School has committed to reducing its waste in the classroom after trialing a smaller bin option in time for National Recycling Week.

Each classroom had only one small desk-sized waste bin last week, encouraging students to consider if something can be reused or recycled.

Middle primary teacher Carla Morgan said the school decided to trial the tiny bins in the lead up to National Recycling Week from November 11 to 17.

"We want to send less to landfill this week," she said.

"We noticed that our kids' packaged food was a huge issue.

"Each class has three bins - organic, the little bin (landfill) and recycling."

The school also appoints 'Lieutenant Landfills' during lunch breaks to help students decide where best to put their rubbish.

Ms Morgan said the school had incorporated design into it as well.

"The kids are also making games to teach people about recycling," she said.

She said they would use the school's 3D printer to make the game pieces.

She said the week had been about finding a problem within the school and doing something about it.

In addition to students learning to reduce waste, the school is preparing to send off its first collection of bread tags to sell to raise money to purchase wheelchairs in South Africa for those in need.

Darci Sunset and Erica Turner in the bread tag pile.

Darci Sunset and Erica Turner in the bread tag pile.

School volunteer Kerryn McEwan said they had collected about 40,000 bread tags in seven months.

She said there were donation points at the Tumby Bay, Port Lincoln and Cummins libraries, Coffin Bay post office and Port Lincoln Prison was also donating its tags.

"This is the first lot leaving the Lower Eyre Peninsula," Ms McEwan said.

"It's not the end of collection it's just the first shipment off for recycling."

Ms McEwan said the school had about 13 kilograms of bread tags and hoped to be able to send recycling shipments off twice a year.