Three overtaking lanes and shoulder sealing earmarked for EP roads

Overtaking lanes and shoulder sealing on the Lower Eyre Peninsula have been earmarked by Member for Flinders Peter Treloar.

The priorities in road upgrades were discussed at a meeting in Port Lincoln last month with local councils and the Department for Planning, Transport and Infrastructure.

Mr Treloar said an overtaking lane south of Tumby Bay, a lane on Western Approach Road and one on the Tod Highway south of Cummins had been named as priorities for the $32 million in road upgrades announced last May in response to the rail closure.

Mr Treloar also said Liverpool Street in Port Lincoln had been assessed as a priority given the increased truck traffic, and works on roundabouts, pavement rehabilitation and pedestrian upgrades including crossings were being considered.

"In the last 12 months DPTI have been assessing state highways and downtown Port Lincoln, so that the government are best able to determine where the money is best spent," he said.

"DPTI have already drafted up a list of priority works and they include upgrades to downtown Port Lincoln, because of course that's where the most congestion is, and also...overtaking lanes on both the Tod and Lincoln highways and shoulder sealing on the state highways as well.

"Overtaking lanes will be most likely south of Tumby Bay and south of Cummins, and I guess by way of explanation that's where traffic numbers begin to increase."

Mr Treloar said the department was now determining the exact locations for the passing lanes to work out where they'll be of "most value", and that works could begin in the second half of 2020.

He said he had also made a personal suggestion to the department about improving the turnoff from the Tod Highway onto the Flinders Highway.

He said local councils where still invited to have input and comment.

"Councils have obviously determined their own priorities as well so they've got the opportunity to contribute," he said.

Eyre Peninsula Local Government Association president and Tumby Bay mayor Sam Telfer said while these priority works were supported generally, more needed to be done.

The projects which have been suggested as recording first priority are generally supported, but what the process has shown is that there is a significant shortfall in funding for projects which need attention.

Sam Telfer

"The councils of the EPLGA have been working with DPTI to help ensure local perspectives are understood," he said.

"The projects which have been suggested as recording first priority are generally supported, but what the process has shown is that there is a significant shortfall in funding for projects which need attention.

"We will continue to advocate to the state for greater funding in recognition of this shortfall."

The question of road upgrades, particularly overtaking lanes, was asked at the Cleve drought forum last Tuesday at which the South Australian Premier Steven Marshall was also present.

"I promise you the $32 million is not the end of it," he said at the gathering.

Mr Treloar said maintaining the roads would take more funding over the long term.

"I think while probably everybody is of the opinion that $32 million is great I would think it is going to take more than that over the long term, so we will be looking for the continuation of a funding stream into Eyre Peninsula roads," he said.

Mr Treloar also said that separate funding had been allocated to the Cleve-Kimba Road to conduct upgrade works and reinstate the road limit to 110 km/h.

He said it will however be one of the last of the roads in the state to have the 110km/h speed limit reinstated, with work expected to commence this August for a target completion date of April 2021.