Grain from Cummins school used in local bakery

Cummins Area School students' efforts have come to fruition this month, with the school's harvested wheat being used in local bread baked at Five Loaves Bakery.

FRESH: Apprentice baker Alyssa Milligan, Year 12 Agriculture students Molly Giddings and Matilda Arbon and baker Teagan Wallace with some locally produced bread.

FRESH: Apprentice baker Alyssa Milligan, Year 12 Agriculture students Molly Giddings and Matilda Arbon and baker Teagan Wallace with some locally produced bread.

Owner Michael Agnew said they had committed the month of February to baking white and wholemeal loaves using the school's grain, which was also milled by local company Cummins Milling.

"We thought we'd do something special for the month and we thought we might as well donate a dollar from each loaf to the fire (and drought) relief," Mr Agnew said.

"We believe we're the only bakery in Australia where we can tell you where the meat and where the grain came from, I know both farmers."

He said Bill Butterfield, who owns the local mill, supplied all their flour except rye and formed the idea of working with the school and bakery.

Agriculture teacher James Pedler said the school's 20 hectare plot was treated as much like a normal farm as they could, with several local ag companies pitching in at harvest time.

"We're all really excited, we do a lot with the kids about the paddock-to-plate thing," he said.

He said while lots of school kids grew up on farms around Cummins, it was still hard to fully understand the idea.

"It's hard to conceptualise when 99 per cent of (the grain) ends up on a ship in Port Lincoln, but literally what the school is growing is going to end up as bread that we eat," he said.

"You do lose the connection so it's awesome that everyone and the school knows it was the wheat grown out the back."

Year 12 student Matilda Arbon said while she sees grain being harvested at the school and at her parents' farm she still never saw the full picture.

"I see the grain but I don't really see that whole process," she said.