Navigator College senior school expansion begins

BUILDING: Navigator College head of senior school Jamie Fewster with Klint Stott from Stotty's Building as work starts on the senior school expansion.
BUILDING: Navigator College head of senior school Jamie Fewster with Klint Stott from Stotty's Building as work starts on the senior school expansion.

Navigator College is excited to see the start of construction of its senior school expansion, expected to be ready in time for the 2021 school year.

Work began on the Senior School Stage Two project, which will see the construction of two science laboratories, art studio, design and technology space, student hub, break out spaces and four additional general learning spaces.

An outdoor stage area will also be constructed.

The project is estimated at $3.5 million, partially funded through a grant from the Commonwealth government.

Navigator College business manager Liz Smith said the school was very excited about the future completion of the senior school and having different specialised learning areas available for the students.

"This facility will allow the college to provide interdisciplinary learning in an authentic way, allowing our learners to effectively engage with a collaboration between the sciences as well as between the disciplines of science and art," she said.

The school's current senior school building was built in 2013 and was officially opened by Member for Grey Rowan Ramsey and Lutheran Education Australia executive director Stephen Rudolph in 2015.

Mrs Smith said there was always the intention of expanding the senior school.

The school has engaged local builders Stotty's Building for the project.

Stotty's Building managing director Klint Stott said the business was very excited as a local business to be involved in this project.

"The aim which is high priority for the school, which flows through to some of our contractors and suppliers is to keep the work local as much as possible," he said.

Navigator College head of senior school Jamie Fewster said staff and students alike were excited to access the new learning spaces.

"We can build our quality of teaching we have and the quality of learning, particularly in science, arts and mathematics," he said.