Support to continue for Holden owners

SUPPORT: City Motors dealer principal Mark Venning says support will continue for new and existing Holden owners for at least the next decade.
SUPPORT: City Motors dealer principal Mark Venning says support will continue for new and existing Holden owners for at least the next decade.

PORT Lincoln's Holden dealership has promised motorists services will still be available even after the brand disappears from Australia.

Last week General Motors announced it was retiring the Holden brand in Australia and New Zealand.

City Motors dealer principal Mark Venning received the news last Monday via a linked-up conference call with other dealers nationwide.

Mr Venning said Holden dealerships like City Motors would continue to provide services to existing and new Holden owners, including warranty, servicing, spare parts and capped-price serving plans over a period of no less than 10 years.

"There are over 1.5 million people who own Holdens in Australia, that's why the Holden dealer network wants to assist them," he said.

City Motors has had a connection with General Motors vehicles since 'Ace Autos' opened in 1936, as a Chevrolet dealer.

This would continue under the ownership of the Redding family, the Sorensen family and finally the Smith Group, which began in 2006.

Mr Venning said this experience has shone a light on how much of a strong connection the Holden brand had with the Australian people.

VINTAGE: Glenn Karutz with his 1976 Holden LE Monaro, one of four vintage Holden vehicles he owns

VINTAGE: Glenn Karutz with his 1976 Holden LE Monaro, one of four vintage Holden vehicles he owns

"There is such a strong affiliation and connection that Holden has with the Australian people," he said.

One of those people is Boston resident Glenn Karutz, whose family has owned Holdens since they first went into production.

His grandparents owned an FX Sedan and an FX ute, two of the first models to bear the Holden name.

Mr Karutz said his parents owned a 1962 EK and 1964 EH models and his first model was a 1968 HK Kingswood.

He said it was sad to see Holden disappear but those who love Holdens would still have a connection to the brand.

"It's sad because it's just another one of our manufacturing industries that's disappeared off the scene and no longer will you have a Holden to buy," he said.

"Anybody that's got an affinity with (Holdens) will still keep and maintain them and I think they will just keep increasing in value."

Mr Karutz, who is secretary of the Lincoln Auto Club, said the club had 449 vehicles on its register, with about 121 of them being Holden cars.