Wiradjuri artist Amanda Hinkelmann signs 3D printed art deal with Urban Road

BIG BREAK: Amanda Hinkelmann's paintings are going to be scanned and turned into 3D printed artworks. Picture: Emma Hillier
BIG BREAK: Amanda Hinkelmann's paintings are going to be scanned and turned into 3D printed artworks. Picture: Emma Hillier

A Wiradjuri artist has caught the attention of a major art company, who will be putting her work through a high-tech scanner and turning them into 3D printed artworks.

Amanda Hinkelmann said there were "screams, squeals, [and] weird jumping in excitement" when she got the offer from Urban Road.

The company will be turning her art into fabrics, wallpapers, and 3D prints which will copy the artworks down to the feel of the texture.

Mrs Hinkelmann has been creating Wiradjuri art for years as a hobby, but only in the past few months has she started doing commissions on a professional basis.

"I've always been creative, and if you have creative energy within you it can't stay in there forever and always," she said.

"It's always in some pursuit, but now it's bubbled out."

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She learnt about the Wiradjuri symbols and stories from various elders around NSW's Riverina at Wagga Wagga, and she incorporates those traditional Aboriginal elements while adding her own colourful, contemporary twist.

She is currently passing on that cultural knowledge to her two daughters, who are learning to paint Wiradjuri art and tell traditional stories.

Urban Road director Mishelle Morgan came across Mrs Hinkelmann's work while browsing Facebook one day, and she said she instantly fell in love with her unique blend of traditional and contemporary art styles.

"Her use of colour and modern display of symbolism is what caught my eye," Ms Morgan said.

"It's a truly modern take on a traditional style of art."

This story Wiradjuri artist's paintings to become 3D printed art first appeared on The Daily Advertiser.