OUR PLACES

Cummins successful in achieving speed change for harvest

CHANGED: The 40km/h signs are now in place on Bruce Terrace at Cummins. Photo: supplied
CHANGED: The 40km/h signs are now in place on Bruce Terrace at Cummins. Photo: supplied

A collective community response has been credited for Cummins seeing a successful push for a temporary speed limit change along Bruce Terrace for the harvest period.

Each year since 2012 the Lower Eyre Peninsula District Council has applied for the 50km/h zone on Bruce Terrace to be reduced to 40km/h due to the truck traffic moving through town on their way to the Cummins silos or to Port Lincoln.

However this year the council was informed before its November meeting by the Department for Infrastructure and Transport that its application was not successful.

Mayor Jo-Anne Quigley said the council was informed that the application did not meet the criteria for a speed limit change.

The department also conducted an 11-hour pedestrian movement count between Tumby Bay Road and Sabey Road in February, with the number of pedestrians and cyclists observed considered too low to satisfy the designation of Bruce Terrace as a high pedestrian activity centre.

Mrs Quigley said the council reached out to and received support from Member for Flinders Peter Treloar and Liberal candidate for Flinders Sam Telfer, and put out a template for a letter to the department, encouraging ratepayers to have their say.

A department spokesperson has confirmed a temporary speed limit change would be in place and acknowledged community concerns on the issue.

"The Department for Infrastructure and Transport has confirmed with the District Council of Lower Eyre Peninsula Council that a temporary 40km/h speed limit can be applied on Bruce Terrace, Cummins, during the annual harvest," the spokesperson said.

"This temporary measure acknowledges council and community concern with increased heavy vehicle traffic during harvest."

Mrs Quigley said the council was delighted with this result and credited the community's response and cooperation.

"This is a great result and I honestly believe it was achieved through working together," she said.

"It goes to show working together on something that matters to the community can achieve results."

She said with the amount of truck traffic that came in, not to mention people going from one side of the rail corridor to the other to visit businesses or for students going to school, it was essential the speed limit change was in place for the harvest season.

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